Friday, July 26, 2013

Hava Nagila (The Movie)




EDUCATIONAL DVDs AVAILABLE NOW
Hava chairs
EDUCATIONAL DVDs AVAILABLE NOW

Hava Nagila (The Movie)
Now Available in DVD
For Schools, Libraries, and 
Universities
 
 "Through the unlikely prism of this song the documentary manages to tell a complicated story of cultural adaptation while providing a fresh look at a good chunk of modern Jewish history, from poverty to plenty, from the shtetl in Ukraine to Israel to the suburbs of America." 
- NY Times
 
This movie has everything: joy and sadness, intrigue and controversy, serious history and pop culture shtick.    
- Heidi Estrin, President, Association of Jewish Libraries
 
"Brilliant! A celebration of Jewish community."
- Jweekly

"A fun, nostalgic, informative journey!"  - LA Times

Grossman deftly tracks the song's path around the world from the shtetls of Eastern Europe through the Holocaust to Israel and the American suburb. - NPR
 
"Keen production, sharp wit, and disarming cultural inquiry."
– Tikkun.org
 
 
It's played at 86 Jewish Film Festivals and opened or closed 56 of them.  It has been theatrically released and enthusiastically reviewedaround the country. Now Hava Nagila (The Movie) is available for purchase by educators of:
 
                                - European Jewish History
                                - American Jewish History
                                - Eastern European Studies
                                - Musicology
                                - Ethnomusicology
                                - Popular Culture
                                - Israel Studies
-Jewish Studies
                                - Religious Studies
                                - Ethnic Studies
  
 

Highly entertaining, this one of a kind documentary uses the ubiquitous Jewish standard as a portal in 200 years of Jewish history, culture and spirituality. The film is also surprisingly deep and moving, quickly turning a group of individual audience members into a Jewish community.


Our film reveals the power of one song to express and sustain identity, to transmit lessons across generations, and to bridge cultural divides and connect us all on a universal level.


Harry Belafonte, Regina Spektor, Connie Francis, and Leonard Nimoy are but a few of the Hava embassadors you will encounter on this Hava quest!


 
Please click here if you would like to purchase either a 55 minute or a 73 minute version of Hava Nagila (The Movie).  For more information about the film, please visit our website or click here to contact July Hodara at Katahdin Productions. 


July Hodara
Katahdin Productions  
www.havanagilamovie.com 

july@katahdin.org
323-424-4210

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Fwd: Youth Music's Exec Director calls for music education re-think

PRESS RELEASE

 

24TH JULY 2013

 

 

YOUTH MUSIC SEMINAR EXPLORES NEW WAYS OF ENGAGING

YOUNG PEOPLE IN MUSIC EDUCATION

 

 

Matt Griffiths , Executive Director of the National Foundation for Youth Music today called for a re- think of music education from the perspective of young people,  at the charity's  "Fresh Thinking for Music Education" seminar broadcast live online from the RSA in London this morning. The event was chaired by Andy Parfitt, former Controller of Radio 1 and Chair of Youth Music.

Key speakers including music journalist Pete Paphides,  BBC Radio 1 presenter Jen Long and music strategist Chris Price explored how young people's  passion for music could be harnessed.

 

Jen Long, presenter of  "BBC Introducing" on Radio 1 highlighted the importance of young people learning about the different types of music careers available to them. 

 

Long feels strongly that learning should not be limited to the classroom. "Work experience is the best way to learn your trade", she added but also argued for young people taking up work placements to be paid.

 

Long wants more to be done to encourage girls to choose music-orientated careers,   pointing to the low numbers of women working as musicians or in the music industry generally.  

 

Renowned journalist Pete Paphides  spoke about nurturing young talent in times of recession.  He queried if there was now a class-based polarity taking place in the music charts. Whilst acknowledging that the latest music technology may be having a democratising effect, he noted that many more successful bands are emerging from fee-paying schools than from traditional working class backgrounds.

 

He felt that a multiplicity of voices was lacking in terms of the range of artists "making it" and that for many young musicians, the gulf between turning their hobby into a full time job had become too difficult to breach.

 

Paphides was clear that it would be na├»ve to expect the benefits system to support young musicians but argued that there was a strong need to support emerging talent, pointing out that bands like Pulp, The Specials and Oasis wouldn't have existed without the dole.  He said "The BRIT School is great but there is only one of them. That's why we need Youth Music to give others that chance".

 

The final key speaker was music strategist Chris Price.  He explored the latest "disclosure" culture and showed how 85% of young Facebook users share their interests in music as a form of self-expression.  Highlighting the huge influence of dance music, he argued the need for young musicians to be allowed to learn music by exploration rather than solely in formal settings. He quoted world-famous bass guitarist and composer Victor Wooten: "As a baby, you were allowed to jam with professionals when you learnt to speak". 

 

Chris described the huge explosion in digital music and systems of sharing music between individuals. "Music and music making are less ends in themselves now than platforms for exploring other disciplines", he said.

 

Finally, Matt Griffiths, Executive Director, Youth Music spoke about the massive appetite amongst young people for  music.  He emphasised that young musicians in the digital age still needed advice and guidance so an important role remained for music leaders and teachers. 

 

He suggested that music educators need to think more from the perspective of young people and argued for less of a divide between  formal and non-formal settings. " It's important to recognise that learning takes place in all kinds of environments  and we should avoid hierarchies of 'good' and 'bad'",  he said.

 

Youth Music is fundraising to pilot a learning module for schools, drawing on Youth Music's  knowledge gained in the music education sector since its foundation in 1999.  The module will be piloted in ten schools to assess its success in increasing pupils' engagement  with music. Development of the module reflects  Youth Music's desire to contribute thought leadership to the music education sector and encourage a greater take-up of music as a GCSE and A level qualification.

 

Arguing for an equality of access to music education for all, Griffiths confirmed that the newly rebranded Youth Music would continue to focus on providing music-making opportunities for those with least opportunity.

 

The "Fresh Thinking for Music Education" seminar may be viewed  online at http://youtu.be/cJTs91K9EYw

 

For more information about the work of Youth Music visit www.youthmusic.org.uk

 

 

ENDS

 

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

 

1.About Youth Music

 

Music-making is life-changing. Every year, Youth Music provides more than 100,000 young people with the opportunity to make music, helping them to overcome the challenges they face in their lives. Our music projects support young people to develop their creative and social skills, make positive contributions to their community and life happy, successful lives.

 

Our on-going research allows us to identify the ways to engage young people and drive fresh-thinking in music education. We also provide a growing online community for thousands of music education professionals. We know that many young people still need our help.

 

Youth Music supports projects working across all music genres.

 

2. For further information please contact:

 

David O'Keeffe,

Media and PR Manager,

Youth Music

 

E: david.okeeffe@youthmusic.org.uk

T: 0207 902 1096

M: 07977 067576

 

 

 

David O'Keeffe
Media and PR Consultant
..........................................................
National Foundation for Youth Music
T 020 7902 1087

website     twitter    facebook

Join us in supporting life-changing music-making.

Donate here

..........................................................................
Suites 3-5, Swan Court, 9 Tanner Street, London, SE1 3LE
Registered charity 1075032
...........................................................................

Friday, July 19, 2013

FINAL REMINDER: CFP SEMPRE Music and Empathy Conference


 
Deadline: 16 August 2013
CALL FOR PAPERS
SEMPRE one-day conference at the University of Hull - Saturday 9 November 2013
 
Music and Empathy
 
This one-day SEMPRE conference hosted by the University of Hull will include invited presentations, a specialist workshop and selected submissions from researchers on the theme of 'music and empathy'. In recent years there has been a growing interest in empathy in the fields of music psychology and education. Research in music and empathy now spans a variety of contexts, including education and development, engagement, understanding, and performance. This conference seeks to draw together current research from a range of areas, and to encourage and stimulate discussion on research in music and empathy.
 
SUBMISSIONS
Contributions are welcome from researchers at all levels and are particularly encouraged from postgraduate students. Submissions should show how the topic relates to the conference theme. Accepted submissions will be broadly organised into themes, and presentations will be chaired by leading researchers. Please send abstracts for spoken papers (max. 200 words) by email to Caroline Waddington (contact details below) by Friday 16 August 2013.
 
For further information, please contact:
Caroline Waddington
Department of Drama and Music
University of Hull
Hull, HU6 7RX

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Fresh thinking for Music Education




 

 

PRESS RELEASE

 

16TH July 2013

 

YOUTH MUSIC TO LIVE-STREAM "FRESH THINKING" EDUCATION SEMINAR

 

The National Foundation for Youth Music will be live-streaming a breakfast seminar looking at new ways young people engage with music and the implications for music education.  The "Fresh Thinking for Music Education" seminar will be of interest to music education professionals keen to hear about the latest developments in the music business and trends in how young people listen to, engage with and make music.

 

Youth Music supports hundreds of music projects providing life-changing music-making for young people with least opportunity, helping them overcome the challenges they face in their lives. The projects provide places for over 100,000 children every year.

 

A specially invited audience will hear three key speakers, including music journalist and radio presenter Pete Paphides, music strategist Chris Price (former Head of Music Last.fm) and Radio 1 presenter Jen Long,  give their perspectives on the latest developments in the music industry and the impact on young people as music-makers, listeners and consumers.

 

The implications for music education will then be explored.

 

The seminar is part of Youth Music's agenda to provide fresh thinking on music education issues, following a rebrand this week. The charity has gained significant knowledge and expertise on such issues since its foundation in 1999.

 

The breakfast seminar takes place on Wednesday July 24th at the RSA in London 8.45am to 10.30am and viewers can watch the seminar live online at www.youthmusic.org.uk/network .

 

Drawing on these key speakers' conclusions and against the backdrop of reducing interest in music as a GCSE and A Level subject, Youth Music's Executive Director Matt Griffiths will discuss the implications for music education and how we can ensure that it meets the needs of young people to reflect and nurture the fast-evolving ways in which they create, share and consume music.

 

The seminar will be chaired by Andy Parfitt, Youth Music Chair of Trustees and former Controller of BBC Radio 1.

Questions for the Q & A panel can be tweeted in live using the hashtag #ymseminar .

 

Youth Music's Executive Director Matt Griffiths says:  "Over the last decade, the ways in which young people engage with music have changed dramatically but despite their music consumption remaining high, interest in music as a curriculum subject in school is reducing. We have three great speakers to examine the changing ways young people enjoy music and we hope this may bring some fresh ideas to how music can be taught, both in and out of school, in a way that harnesses the musical passions of our younger generation."

 

View the seminar live online on Wednesday 24th July 8.45am  at www.youthmusic.org.uk/network . Questions for the Q & A panel can be tweeted in live using the hashtag #ymseminar .

 

ENDS

 

 

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

 

1. Seminar Key Speakers and Themes

Chris Price has worked in music and the media for fifteen years including MTV, Radio1 and most recently as Head of Music for online music discovery service Last.fm.  His theme Disclosure Culture: discovery, sharing and the new language of music-making in the digital age will explore the changing ways that young people discover, share and make music as a form of self-expression. He will provide an up-to-the-minute insight into the new language of music-making, sharing and discovery.

The career of Jen Long extends well beyond broadcasting. She has spent much of her time promoting new bands at live gigs and on her record label Kissability in addition to editing the quarterly music magazine 'Zero Core', DJing, blogging and playing in bands. In 2012, Q magazine named her as one of the most influential young voices in music. She is well placed to explore the theme "Music careers in the 21st Century" and examine how young people's passion for music can be harnessed in many different ways.

 

Pete Paphides, veteran music journalist and radio presenter's theme will be 'Nurturing young music innovation in a time of recession'. He will examine the effects of the economic downturn on music-making but provide an optimistic view of why cuts and the recession should not be a barrier to young people making music. He will draw on his experience as a longstanding observer of the music industry and his lesser known role of mentoring new bands.

 

2. About Youth Music

 

Music-making is life-changing. Every year, Youth Music provides more than 100,000 young people with the opportunity to make music, helping them to overcome the challenges they face in their lives. Our music projects support young people to develop their creative and social skills, make positive contributions to their community and life happy, successful lives.

Our on-going research allows us to identify the ways to engage young people and drive fresh-thinking in music education. We also provide a growing online community for thousands of music education professionals. We know that many young people still need our help.

Youth Music supports projects working across all music genres.

 

3. For further information please contact:

 

David O'Keeffe,

Media and PR Consultant,

Youth Music

 

E: david.okeeffe@youthmusic.org.uk

T: 0207 902 1096

M: 07977 067576

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David O'Keeffe
Media and PR Consultant
..........................................................
National Foundation for Youth Music
T 020 7902 1087

website     twitter    facebook

Join us in supporting life-changing music-making.

Donate here

..........................................................................
Suites 3-5, Swan Court, 9 Tanner Street, London, SE1 3LE
Registered charity 1075032
...........................................................................

 

 

 

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

BKN25 Symposium: Milestones in Music Cognition

Milestones in Music Cognition: A Quarter-Century Celebration of Books
by Bregman, Krumhansl and Narmour (BKN25)

In 1990, three major books were published that were to become
transformative pillars in the field of music cognition research and
beyond:

Albert Bregman's Auditory Scene Analysis: The Perceptual Organization
of Sound, MIT Press.

Carol Lynne Krumhansl's The Cognitive Foundations of Musical Pitch,
Oxford University Press, and

Eugene Narmour's The Analysis and Cognition of Basic Melodic
Structures: The Implication-Realization Model. The University of
Chicago Press.

In anticipation of the 25th anniversary of these influential tomes, a
two-day symposium will be held at the Schulich School of Music of
McGill University in Montreal July 7-8, 2014. The symposium will be
composed of opening and closing keynote addresses, three sessions with
invited speakers reflecting upon the impact of the honorees' work on
the fields of music psychology, music theory, cognitive neuroscience
and engineering, and a contributed poster session. Musical interludes
will be provided by the students and faculty of the Schulich School of
Music. The invited talks include:

Opening introduction: Lola Cuddy, Queen's University

Opening keynote: Caroline Palmer, McGill University

Session in honor of Albert Bregman (chaired by Stephen McAdams, McGill
University)

Claude Alain, Rotman Research Institute and University of Toronto

Dan Ellis, Columbia University

David Huron, Ohio State University

Albert Bregman, McGill University (discussant)

Session in honor of Carol Lynne Krumhansl (chaired by David Temperley,
Eastman School of Music)

Elaine Chew, Queen Mary University of London

Fred Lerdahl, Columbia University

William Forde Thompson, Macquarie University

Carol Lynne Krumhansl, Cornell University (discussant)

Session in honor of Eugene Narmour (chaired by Alexander Rozin, West
Chester University)

Justin London, Carleton College

Frank Russo, Ryerson University

Zohar Eitan, Tel Aviv University

Eugene Narmour, University of Pennsylvania (discussant)

Closing keynote: Robert Gjerdingen, Northwestern University

Poster session (open to submissions)

Participants who wish to present their own work in the poster session
may submit abstracts to the email address (bkn25@music.mcgill.ca) by
March 1, 2014. The posters should present current research that
relates in a direct way to the work of one or more of the honorees.
Abstracts should be no more than 200 words. A selection committee will
examine the submissions and authors will be informed of the outcome by
April 1, 2014.

A special issue of Music Perception to honor these three books will be
organized by guest editors David Temperley, Alexander Rozin and
Stephen McAdams, targeting the June 2015 issue. Manuscripts for this
special issue should be submitted directly to the journal by October
1, 2014 (indicate in the cover letter that the submission is intended
for the special issue). Speakers and poster presenters at the McGill
symposium are encouraged to submit. All manuscripts will be reviewed
through the normal procedure. The final versions of all submissions
must be accepted by February 28, 2015 to be considered for inclusion
in the special issue. Due to the limited page space for a single
issue, papers that are deemed acceptable for publication in Music
Perception but for which space is not available will appear in
subsequent issues of the journal.

We hope the music cognition community will join us in celebrating our
colleagues both at the symposium and through their submissions to the
special issue. Further information concerning registration and lodging
possibilities for the symposium will be available in the near future
on the symposium website: http://www.music.mcgill.ca/bkn25. But mark
this momentous event in your calendar now!

The organizing committee

Lola Cuddy

Stephen McAdams

Alexander Rozin

David Temperley