Wednesday, December 19, 2012

International Summer School in Sheffield: Call for participation

Dear all

The Music Mind Machine research center, Department of Music, the
University of Sheffield, will host coming July (8th-11th) an
International Summer School on Musical Understanding: Philosophical,
Psychological and Neuroscientific approaches.



Confirmed speakers are Corrado Sinigaglia (University of Milan); Katie
Overy (University of Edinburgh); Tuomas Eerola (University of
Jyväskylä); Nikki Dibben and Renee Timmers (University of Sheffield).



The Summer school will focus on:



1) Interdisciplinary approach to musical understanding
2) Mirror neurons and the enactive aspects of musicality
3) Emotional feedback in musical experience



What phenomenological experiences are connected to musical engagement
and understanding? What is the role of the bodily motor knowledge in
the sense-giving process of musical comprehension? What faculties
underlie musical understanding and how are these reflected in
neuroscientific and psychological findings?



The summer school will investigate musical understanding from
philosophical, psychological and neuroscientific perspectives and will
address the raised questions through presentations, discussions,
reading groups, and analysis of empirical work conducted before and
during the summer school. The aim of the school is to provide an
opportunity to engage with cutting edge research, interact with
leading academics and participate actively in debate, research design,
analysis and presentation.



Open to graduate students with a clear interest and some prior
experience with psychology of music.
We would be most grateful if you could circulate this email among your
colleagues and students.



Please have a look at the official Summer School's webpage for further
information:
http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/research/mmm/mmmsummerschool/index



Thank you very much for your time and consideration



All the very best



--
The International Summer School on Musical Understanding Committee
(A. Schiavio, Y. Arthurs, S. Bramley, T. Veltri, Dr. N. Dibben and Dr.
R. Timmers)
Department of Music, University of Sheffield
34, Leavygreave Road, Sheffield, S3 7RD

Sunday, December 16, 2012

Fwd: PhD Scholarships in Music at Hull University

ANNOUNCEMENT

PhD Scholarships in Music for September 2013 at Hull University. The
deadline for applications is 11 January 2013. Music scholarships are
available in the following areas:

Composition (Supervision available in acoustic and electro-acoustic practise)
Musicology (Preference for Nineteenth/Twentieth Century British Music)
Performance Studies including conducting.

Research specialisms of music staff are listed on the website and
these include psychology of music, perception/cognition, film,
jazz/popular music, music and words, music theatre, and music
analysis.

For further information, please visit the Hull University website:

http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/graduateschool/phdscholarships.aspx

Call for papers: Creative teaching for creative learning in higher academic music education

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Liz Haddon <liz.haddon@york.ac.uk>
Date: 13 December 2012 11:42
Subject: Call for papers
To: MUSIC-AND-SCIENCE@jiscmail.ac.uk


** The Music and Science list is managed by the Institute of Musical
Research (www.music.sas.ac.uk) as a bulletin board and discussion
forum for researchers working at the shared boundaries of science and
music. ** MESSAGE FOLLOWS: On Monday 13 May 2013 the Music Department
at the University of York will be hosting a seminar day funded by The
Higher Education Academy as part of their discipline workshop and
seminar series, entitled:

Creative teaching for creative learning in higher academic music education

Creativity and creative skills are recognised as key attributes for
music students. This event will bring together higher music education
colleagues to learn about, share and discuss their experiences of
teaching creatively to facilitate creative learning, focusing on the
processes and techniques of creative teaching, particularly those
connected to academic, rather than practical learning.

The event will:

- explore and explain how lecturers conceptualise creativity;

- demonstrate how music lecturers construct their academic teaching to
develop creative skills in students;

- provide significant insights into our understanding of the
intersection of creative teaching and creative learning.

The seminar will explore creative teaching in higher music learning
focusing on academic (rather than practical) areas, although there
will inevitably be some overlap as practical work and composition will
be discussed within the parameters of academic teaching. The event
will feature presentations from 1) Keynote speaker (Dr Pamela Burnard,
Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge); 2) Invited speakers
working in higher music education; 3) A reflective student feedback
session.

Call for papers

Proposals of no more than 200 words are invited for consideration for
20-minute spoken papers (each to be followed by 10 minutes for
questions and discussion). Please provide your name, email address,
institution and title of paper, and send proposals to Liz Haddon,
Research Fellow, Music Department, University of York, Heslington,
York YO10 5DD or email liz.haddon@york.ac.uk by 1st February 2013.




--


Dr Evangelos Himonides
Institute of Education
University of London

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Music Encoding Conference 2013


============================================
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
The Music Encoding Conference 2013: Concepts, Methods, Editions
22-24 May, 2013
============================================

You are cordially invited to participate in the Music Encoding Conference 2013 – Concepts, Methods, Editions, to be held 22-24 May, 2013, at the Mainz Academy for Literature and Sciences in Mainz, Germany.

Music encoding is now a prominent feature of various areas in musicology and music librarianship. The encoding of symbolic music data provides a foundation for a wide range of scholarship, and over the last several years, has garnered a great deal of attention in the digital humanities. This conference intends to provide an overview of the current state of data modeling, generation, and use, and aims to introduce new perspectives on topics in the fields of traditional and computational musicology, music librarianship, and scholarly editing, as well as in the broader area of digital humanities.

As the conference has a dual focus on music encoding and scholarly editing in the context of the digital humanities, the Program Committee is also happy to announce keynote lectures by Frans Wiering (Universiteit Utrecht) and Daniel Pitti (University of Virginia), both distinguished scholars in their respective fields of musicology and markup technologies in the digital humanities.

Proposals for papers, posters, panel discussions, and pre-conference workshops are encouraged.  Prospective topics for submissions include:
* theoretical and practical aspects of music, music notation models, and scholarly editing
* rendering of symbolic music data in audio and graphical forms
* relationships between symbolic music data, encoded text, and facsimile images
* capture, interchange, and re-purposing of music data and metadata
* ontologies, authority files, and linked data in music encoding
* additional topics relevant to music encoding and music editing

For paper and poster proposals, abstracts of no more than 1000 words, with no more than five relevant bibliographic references, are requested.  Panel sessions may be one and a half or three hours in length.

Abstracts for panel sessions, describing the topic and nature of the session and including short biographies of the participants, should be no longer than 2000 words.

Proposals for pre-conference workshops, to be held on May 21st, must include a description of space and technical requirements.

Author guidelines and authoritative stylesheets for each submission type will be made available on the conference webpage at http://music-encoding.org/conference/2013 in early December.

All accepted papers, posters, and panel sessions will be included in the conference proceedings, tentatively scheduled to be published by the end of 2013.

Important dates:
31 December 2012: Deadline for abstract submissions
31 January 2013: Notification of acceptance/rejection of submissions
21-24 May 2013: Conference
31 July 2013: Deadline for submission of full papers for conference proceedings
December 2013: Publication of conference proceedings

Additional details will be announced on the conference webpage (http://music-encoding.org/conference/2013).

If you have any questions, please contact conference2013@music-encoding.org.

------
Program Committee:
Ichiro Fujinaga, McGill University, Montreal
Niels Krabbe, Det Kongelige Bibliotek, København,
Elena Pierazzo, King's College, London
Eleanor Selfridge-Field, CCARH, Stanford
Joachim Veit, Universität Paderborn, Detmold

(Local) Organizers:
Johannes Kepper, Universität Paderborn
Daniel Röwenstrunk, Universität Paderborn
Perry Roland, University of Virginia

For the Program Committee and the local organizers,


Raffaele Viglianti
PhD Candidate and PG Research Assistant
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
WC2B 5RL

Thursday, November 8, 2012

Call for POSTERS for Foundations for Excellence Conference 2013

CALL FOR POSTERS



Foundations for Excellence 2013

Environments and Models



25 – 26 February 2013

Dartington Hall, Totnes, Devon - England



http://www.foundations-for-excellence.org.uk/



The next biannual conference of Foundations for Excellence will be
held 25 – 26 February 2013. It is an opportunity for music and dance
practitioners to join together and share best practice about the
Health and Wellbeing of Young Musicians and Dancers. This year's
conference will focus on Environments and Models, what are examples of
best practise in which musicians and dancers can learn and develop
safely and what we can do to improve those environments and models.

Submissions



Poster submissions detailing original research are invited from across
the performing arts and other performance disciplines. Submissions
should take the form of 500-word structured abstracts, with
information provided under each of the following headings:



· Background

· Aims

· Main contribution

· Implications

· Keywords (n=5)



Submissions should be sent to s.brewer@swms.org.uk by 14th December
2012. Indicate 'F4E 2013' in the subject line of the email.



Review process



Each submission will be reviewed anonymously by the F4E Steering Group
according to its originality, importance, clarity, and
interdisciplinarity. Corresponding authors will be notified by email
of the Steering Group's decision by 14th January 2013. Once accepted,
no changes of author or title will be permitted. Posters must be
delivered at the conference as projected in the submitted proposals or
represent bona fide developments of the same research. All presenters
are required to register for the conference.



The official language of the conference is English.







Sophie Brewer

Programmes Manager - South West Music School

PO Box 730

Exeter

Devon EX1 9RA



Tel :- 01392 460770



visit www.swms.org.uk for all up-to-date information



************************************************************

South West Music School

registered in England as a company limited by guarantee and a charity.

Company No. 7307202 Charity No. 1138482

Registered office: Foot Anstey, Senate Court, Southernhay Gardens,
Exeter. EX1 1NT (NOT a correspondence address)

Tel: 01392 411221 Fax: 01392 685220

website: www.footanstey.com






Please consider the environment. Do you need to print this email?
This e-mail, and any attachments, are private and intended only for
the personal and confidential use of the designated recipient(s)
above. Unauthorised use, disclosure, storage or copying are
prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please destroy all
copies and inform the sender by return e-mail.
Although the Royal College of Music ICT Department checks emails and
attachments for known viruses and other defects, you open attachments
at your own risk. The Royal College of Music accepts no responsibility
for any loss or damage arising in any way from the receipt or use of
this message. Full contact details are found at www.rcm.ac.uk.

______________________________________________________________________
This email has been scanned by the Symantec Email Security.cloud service.
For more information please visit http://www.symanteccloud.com
______________________________________________________________________


--


Dr Evangelos Himonides
Institute of Education
University of London

Venezuela's Youth Orchestra Program El Sistema: Myths, Metaphors and Realities, Tue 13 Nov in room 944

Research Seminar Announcement


Venezuela's Youth Orchestra Program El Sistema: Myths, Metaphors and Realities

Dr Geoff Baker, Royal Holloway, University of London

Tuesday 13th November

12.45-1.45

Room 944:

Further details from Lucy Green, l.green2@ioe.ac.uk

All are welcome!


The Venezuelan youth orchestra program El Sistema has garnered much
attention and praise in recent years. It has been enthusiastically
endorsed by major musical figures - Simon Rattle described it as "the
most important thing happening in music anywhere in the world" - and
by prestigious international institutions such as UNESCO and the
Inter-American Development Bank.

Yet there is very little in the way of research on El Sistema.
External monitoring and evaluation have been largely absent, so most
writing on the topic is based on spectacular concerts, red-carpet
tours, official interviews, and information from El Sistema's PR
department. This paper represents a first attempt to examine
critically some of the claims made by and for El Sistema on the basis
of extensive research in Venezuela.

Touching on the little-known history of the program's founder, Jose
Antonio Abreu, and of the gestation of the project itself, I analyze
the notion that El Sistema is a "revolutionary social program." It is
widely reported that the program is extremely successful: on what
basis are such claims made, and to what extent are they verifiable?
After considering the relationship between orchestral metaphors and
realities, I scrutinize the musical and social education that
participants receive through orchestral training, and thus the core
idea of "music as social action." Addressing issues such as social
inclusion, discipline, democracy, and teamwork, I ask: does an
orchestra represent an ideal, harmonious society, as the program
claims? If El Sistema is a "school of social life," what sort of
society does it model?

The implications of this analysis may be significant, given that the
program has captured the imagination of music educators and policy
makers around the globe and is being enthusiastically copied in dozens
of countries, including the UK.


Geoff Baker is a Reader in the music department at Royal Holloway,
University of London. He is the author of Imposing Harmony: Music and
Society in Colonial Cuzco (Duke University Press, 2008), which won the
American Musicological Society's Robert Stevenson Award in 2010, and
Buena Vista in the Club: Rap, Reggaetón, and Revolution in Havana
(Duke University Press, 2011). His recent research encompasses
childhood musical learning and music education in Cuba and Venezuela.
He was co-investigator on the AHRC-funded project "Growing into
music," and is making a series of documentaries and short films about
young musicians in Cuba and Venezuela. He also held a British Academy
Research Development Award in 2010-11 and undertook fieldwork in
Venezuela on the country's orchestral music education program, El
Sistema. He is in the later stages of writing a book on this topic. He
is currently attached to Oxford University, working on a project
entitled "Music, Digitization, Mediation: Towards Interdisciplinary
Music Studies."

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology | Research Topics



Dear Evangelos,

In collaboration with Frontiers in Psychology, I am currently organizing a Research Topic, "Music and the embodied mind: A jam session for theorists on musical improvisation, instrumental self-extension, and the biological and social basis of music and well-being", and as host editor I think that your work could make an excellent contribution.

All of the information for this Call for Papers can be found by following the link below to the Research Topic webpage. Also, please share this Call for Papers with friends and colleagues that you feel might be interested in contributing a submission. Thanks very much!

Best,
Adam
Guest Associate Chief Editor, Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology

http://www.frontiersin.org/Theoretical_and_Philosophical_Psychology/researchtopics/Music_and_the_embodied_mind_A_/1239
Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology | Research Topics

Source: frontiersin.org

Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology | Research Topics publishes articles on the most outstanding discoveries across the research spectrum of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology | Research Topics.

 

croom@sas.upenn.edu sent this using ShareThis. Please note that ShareThis does not verify the ownership of this email address.


ULCC: Autumn Concert

ULCC: Autumn Concert

Conference: Oliver Knussen at 60 | Friday the 2nd of November | Garden Room, Barbican| 10am-6pm



Dear all,

 

We are delighted to announce details of a forthcoming Event as part of the Guildhall ResearchWorks series:

Conference: Oliver Knussen at 60
Friday the 2nd of November | Garden Room, Barbican| 10am-6pm

Co-hosted by the Institute of Musical Research and the Guildhall School, this one day event explores and celebrates the extraordinary achievements of one of Britain's most inspirational musicians. Speakers including Julian Anderson, George Benjamin, Arnold Whittall and Edward Venn offer their perspective on Knussen's music and his career as composer, conductor and teacher. This is an invaluable opportunity to place the music of Oliver Knussen in a wide and imaginative context before hearing repertoire performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Guildhall students on Sunday 4th November at the Barbican.

Tickets: £25 (£15 students) available from:
Barbican Box Office: 020 7638 8891 www.barbican.org.uk

For details of other events as part of the series visit www.gsmd.ac.uk/research

 

Best wishes,

 

 

Esther Fowler

Research & Knowledge Exchange Coordinator

 

Guildhall School of Music & Drama

Silk Street, Barbican

London EC2Y 8DT

020 7628 2571 ext. 5104

 


Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Call for Contributions: DMRN+7: Digital Music Research Network One-Day Workshop 2012

*** CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS ***

DMRN+7: Digital Music Research Network 1-Day Workshop 2012

People's Palace Lecture Theatre One (PP1)
Queen Mary University of London

18 December 2012



http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp7/





* Keynote Speaker
Prof. George Tzanetakis (University of Victoria, Canada)
will talk on "Reinventing the vibraphone using non-invasive sensing".




Digital music is an important and fast-moving research area. Sophisticated
digital tools for the creation, generation and dissemination of music have
established clear synergies between music and leisure industries, the use of
technology within art, the creative industries and the creative economy.
Digital music research is emerging as a "transdiscipline" across the usual
academic boundaries of computer science, electronic engineering and music.

The Digital Music Researh Network (DMRN) aims to promote research in the
area of Digital Music, by bringing together researchers from UK universities
and industry in electronic engineering, computer science, and music.

DMRN will be holding its next 1-day workshop on
** Tuesday 18 December 2012 **

The workshop will include invited and contributed talks, and posters will be
on display during the day, including during the lunch and coffee breaks.

The workshop will be an ideal opportunity for networking with other people
working in the area. There will also be an opportunity to continue
discussions after the Workshop in a nearby Pub/Restaurant.





* Call for Contributions

You are invited to submit a proposal for a talk and/or a poster to be
presented at this event.

TALKS may range from the latest research, through research overviews or
surveys, to opinion pieces or position statements, particularly those likely

to be of interest to an interdisciplinary audience. Most talks will be 20 to
30 minutes, although there may be some flexibility to accommodate other
lengths depending on the number of submissions. Short announcements about
other items of interest (e.g. future events or other networks) are also
welcome.

POSTERS can be on any research topic of interest to the members of the
network. Posters (A0 portrait) will be on display through the day, including

lunch break and coffee breaks.

The abstracts of presentations will be collated into a digest and
distributed on the day, and authors will be encouraged to submit an
electronic versions of posters (e.g. in PDF format) to allow the posters to
be viewed after the event.

* Submission

Please submit your talk or poster proposal in the form of an abstract
(maximum 1 page of A4) in an email to dmrn@eecs.qmul.ac.uk giving the
following information about your presentation:
* Authors
* Title
* Abstract
* Preference for talk or poster (or "no preference").

Abstract submission deadline: Friday 16 November 2012.


* Deadlines

* 16 Nov 2011: Abstract submission deadline
* 30 Nov 2012: Notification of acceptance
* 7 Dec 2012: Early Bird Registration deadline
* 18 Dec 2012: DMRN+7 Workshop

For further information, visit:

http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp7/


For past events, visit:

http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp6/

http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp5/

http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp4/
http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp3/
http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/dmrn/events/dmrnp2/

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Macbeth, Montage and Machinima -Thu 25 October 2012, 3-5pm- part of the Inside Out Festival

Blue Room, BFI Southbank, Belvedere Road, South Bank, London SE1 8XT

Free but booking required – through the link below:

http://www.insideoutfestival.org.uk/events/macbeth-montage-and-machinima/

This event will feature presentations by participants in two projects
from the DARE (Digital Arts Research Education) Collaborative at the
Institute of Education (IOE), working with partners in the British
Film Institute (BFI) and at London's Globe Theatre.

The first project was jointly organised by the BFI and the
Cinematheque Francaise in Paris and explored the intervention of the
"real" in fiction. This project also produced two "machinima" films
made by year 7 students in Cambridge. These are 3D animations made
using the software Moviestorm, and are fantasy sci fi and horror
stories.

In the second project a partnership was formed between Shakespeare's
Globe and Immersive Education, who produced the game-authoring
software, Missionmaker. Students created games which drew on a key
scene from Macbeth, involving them in a rich digital and cultural
experience.

Students from the schools will present the work, alongside their
teachers, and they will be happy to discuss the work with the
audience.

From London, students from the London Nautical School will attend with
their teacher Chris Waugh and researcher/evaluator, Michelle Cannon.

From Cambridge there will be students from Parkside Federation with
their teacher, James Durran. The event will be hosted by Mark Reid
from BFI Education, and, from the IOE, Andrew Burn and John Potter.


Free but booking required – through the link below:

http://www.insideoutfestival.org.uk/events/macbeth-montage-and-machinima/

The First International Conference of Dalcroze Studies



  
Movements in music education:
The First International Conference of Dalcroze Studies
 
24 - 26 July 2013
Coventry University, UK
                                                                                                                                                         

Our conference
In recent years there has been an upsurge in the academic study of embodiment and the centrality of movement and rhythm in music cognition, education and performance. This conference seeks to extend our understanding of Dalcroze Eurhythmics from these and a wide variety of other perspectives: historical, cultural, socio-political, theoretical, philosophical and empirical. It also seeks to promote interdisciplinary dialogue between researchers into Dalcroze Eurhythmics and those from a wide field of related disciplines and practices.

2013 sees the centenary of the London School of Dalcroze Eurhythmics (LSDE), founded to promote the teaching method of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze (1865-1950) in the UK. This is the first international conference of Dalcroze Studies and is part of the celebrations to mark the centenary of the LSDE.


Confirmed keynote speakers
Prof. Louise Mathieu, Université Laval, Canada
Prof. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone, University of Oregon, USA
Dr Katie Overy, University of Edinburgh, UK
          

 

    

    
Call for Abstracts

We would like to invite presentations on topics such as, but not limited to, the following:

  • Emile Jaques-Dalcroze, his teaching, writings, composition and improvisation, and his musical, philosophical and cultural influences
  • The history and impact of Dalcroze Eurhythmics worldwide
  • The relationships between Dalcroze Eurhythmics, theatre, dance and other educational and somatic practices
  • Past and present applications of Dalcroze Eurhythmics
  • Current pedagogical practice
  • Dalcroze, health and wellbeing
  • The Dalcroze identity

 


We also welcome related presentations on music, movement and the body from a range of disciplines and perspectives including: aesthetics, dance, ethnomusicology, evolutionary biology, gender politics, improvisation, music analysis, music pedagogy, music therapy, musicology, neuroscience, performance studies, phenomenology, psychology, somatic practices and spirituality. Performances of Jaques-Dalcroze's music or related repertoire are welcome as well as presentations of plastique animée, theatrical or dance work. Poster presentations may be invited, depending on the amount of submissions received.

                 

Deadline for abstract submission: 7 January 2013      

To submit your abstract click here

For more information on submitting your abstract click here

Registration for the conference will begin end of October
                 

       
        




Society for Music Education in Ireland Conference, Limerick 9-11 Nov

 

 

 

 

The 2nd Annual Conference of the Society for Music Education in Ireland takes place at Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick 9-11th November. The conference programme includes a variety of papers, poster, workshops and performances on current national and international music education research and practice. The Keynote speaker is Prof Margaret Barrett (President of the International Society for Music Education). The conference fee for students (including membership) is just €35 and the conference venue is only 30 minutes from Shannon Airport. Further details of travel, registration and accommodation can be found at www.smei.ie. For all other enquiries, email smei2012committee@gmail.com

 

 


Venezuela's Youth Orchestra Program El Sistema: Myths, Metaphors and Realities

Venezuela's Youth Orchestra Program El Sistema: Myths, Metaphors and Realities

Music Education Special Interest Group
Research Seminar Announcement


Venezuela's Youth Orchestra Program El Sistema: Myths, Metaphors and Realities

Dr Geoff Baker, Royal Holloway, University of London

Tuesday 13th November

12.45-1.45

Room 944: TO BE CONFIRMED

Further details from Lucy Green, l.green2@ioe.ac.uk

All are welcome!


The Venezuelan youth orchestra program El Sistema has garnered much
attention and praise in recent years. It has been enthusiastically
endorsed by major musical figures - Simon Rattle described it as "the
most important thing happening in music anywhere in the world" - and
by prestigious international institutions such as UNESCO and the
Inter-American Development Bank.

Yet there is very little in the way of research on El Sistema.
External monitoring and evaluation have been largely absent, so most
writing on the topic is based on spectacular concerts, red-carpet
tours, official interviews, and information from El Sistema's PR
department. This paper represents a first attempt to examine
critically some of the claims made by and for El Sistema on the basis
of extensive research in Venezuela.

Touching on the little-known history of the program's founder, Jose
Antonio Abreu, and of the gestation of the project itself, I analyze
the notion that El Sistema is a "revolutionary social program." It is
widely reported that the program is extremely successful: on what
basis are such claims made, and to what extent are they verifiable?
After considering the relationship between orchestral metaphors and
realities, I scrutinize the musical and social education that
participants receive through orchestral training, and thus the core
idea of "music as social action." Addressing issues such as social
inclusion, discipline, democracy, and teamwork, I ask: does an
orchestra represent an ideal, harmonious society, as the program
claims? If El Sistema is a "school of social life," what sort of
society does it model?

The implications of this analysis may be significant, given that the
program has captured the imagination of music educators and policy
makers around the globe and is being enthusiastically copied in dozens
of countries, including the UK.


Geoff Baker is a Reader in the music department at Royal Holloway,
University of London. He is the author of Imposing Harmony: Music and
Society in Colonial Cuzco (Duke University Press, 2008), which won the
American Musicological Society's Robert Stevenson Award in 2010, and
Buena Vista in the Club: Rap, Reggaetón, and Revolution in Havana
(Duke University Press, 2011). His recent research encompasses
childhood musical learning and music education in Cuba and Venezuela.
He was co-investigator on the AHRC-funded project "Growing into
music," and is making a series of documentaries and short films about
young musicians in Cuba and Venezuela. He also held a British Academy
Research Development Award in 2010-11 and undertook fieldwork in
Venezuela on the country's orchestral music education program, El
Sistema. He is in the later stages of writing a book on this topic. He
is currently attached to Oxford University, working on a project
entitled "Music, Digitization, Mediation: Towards Interdisciplinary
Music Studies."

Saturday, October 13, 2012

About OpenSoundS

What is OpenSoundS?

OpenSoundS is a collaborative online environment, where students from across Europe can
  • showcase their works on Music & Sound
  • collaborate with their peers
  • exchange knowledge and know-how
  • learn about the latest tools in Music Technology and I.T.
  • engage in constructive online dialogue
  • learn about intellectual property, copyright and sharing
  • learn how to manage and participate effectively in collaborative projects,
  • and, also, have fun engaging in these activities.
The OpenSoundS platform ensures that this online experience is achieved within a secure, intuitive and accessible environment.

Who is behind OpenSoundS?

OpenSoundS is a collaborative European project, funded by the EC's Education and Culture Lifelong Learning Programme.
Partners of the OpenSoundS project are:
  • Istituto tecnico Attilio Deffenu [visit]
  • EarMaster [visit]
  • DEI - Università di Padova [visit]
  • MidiWare [visit]
  • Nuvole [visit]
  • Brightonart [visit]
  • International Music Education Research Centre (iMERC) [visit]

Access and Registration

How do I access the online collaborative system?

The OpenSoundS collaborative platform is accessible at: live.opensounds.eu

How do I start?

Although you don't need an account in order to browse projects and listen to the available tracks, you can only have the full OpenSoundS experience if you have an online account. Please see below, depending on whether you are a teacher or student.

I am a teacher, how do I get involved?

During this testing phase, accounts can only be activated by a project partner. If you would like to be involved, please contact an OpenSoundS project partner (information about the OpenSoundS partners can be found here: http://www.opensounds.eu/partners). You can apply for an OpenSoundS account by visiting the OpenSoundS collaborative platform here: live.opensounds.eu, and selecting the create a new account linkat the very top right hand side. You will receive the necessary information from the OpenSounds system once your account has been activated.

I am a student, how do I get involved?

Make sure that your teachers know about OpenSoundS! Ask them to join (see above). Once they have joined, they will be able to create an account for you. You can apply for an OpenSoundS account by visiting the OpenSoundS collaborative platform here: live.opensounds.eu, and selecting the create a new account linkat the very top right hand side. You will receive the necessary information from the OpenSounds system once your account has been activated. The person that will be responsible for your account is likely to be your Head of Music, or Music Technology, but things could be different in your school. A member of the OpenSoundS team will let you know if there is a problem.

My parents are concerned about having accounts online. How safe is it to use OpenSoundS?

Open SoundS is a platform created and actively maintained by Professionals, Researchers and Academics with great experience, internationally, in virtual learning and online collaboration. Your work and activities are safeguarded at numerous levels. Student users are protected by 4 levels of scrutiny:
  1. their peers
  2. their teachers
  3. the project partners
  4. the OpenSoundS server administrators
OpenSoundS is a closed family (although a BIG family!!!). All family members are welcome to enjoy their online activities and sharing using a safe online platform and free of bullying, negativity, and non constructive criticism. It is essential that all OpenSoundS registered users treat their colleagues in a respectful and courteous manner. We operate a zero tolerance policy about abusive behaviour.

Project Area

I have an account, now what?

Congratulations! You are now able to post ideas, create projects, collaborate, discuss and communicate with all OpenSoundS users.

How do I log onto OpenSoundS?

  • go to live.opensounds.eu
  • click on Log in (top right)
  • type in your username
  • type in your password
  • click on the Log in button at the bottom


How can I see the latest projects posted on OpenSoundS?

  • click on the Latest Projects link, available on the left-hand side navigation panel
  • a list of latest projects appears in the main window
  • There, you can have a quick overview of
    • the project title,
    • the owner,
    • a brief description,
    • and information about the project activity...
  • you can, of course, listen to the main project mp3 file!
  • you can also use the fast OpenSoundS search engine and search by project title, tags and owner.

How can I browse all projects available on OpenSoundS?

  • simply follow the link named Browse Projects under the Projects sub-menu on the left-hand side
  • this will take you to the Projects page where the complete body of available projects can be found
  • Don't forget to use the dynamic search boxes on the top if you are looking for something specific, you can search for project Title, project specific Tags and project Owner
An additional way to navigate through the numerous projects posted on OpenSoundS is to use the Projects List available under the Projects sub-menu.

Collaborative Area

What should I start with? An idea, or a project?

Normally, you should start with an idea on the OpenSoundS collaborative platform. The Ideas section is where you can describe your aspirations, find interesting musicians around Europe to collaborate with, discuss the different technologies that are likely to be needed once the idea develops into a fruitful project, discuss the level of experience/expertise, and describe your needs/requirements and thoughts about how you could have a successful project.
It is common for us musicians to want to go straight into playing our instrument and making music, but years of research and evidence from extremely successful past research projects demonstrate that the more careful your planning is, and the more detailed the information that you provide during the framing of your idea, the greater the success of your final project is going to be. Help other musicians work with you meaningfully and enjoyably. You will be rewarded!

What are OpenSoundS ideas?

An idea in OpenSoundS is what you can post when you are not yet ready to post your project. This is where you can:
  • invite other's to a discussion about a future project
  • invite expression of interest from other OpenSoundS users that might be willing to contribute to a future project
  • request help from other instrument players (e.g. you are a guitarist that looks for a bass or drums player)
  • discuss the possibility of a collaboration with other musicians and producers
  • let the OpenSoundS community know about something that you are working on

How do I post an idea?

  • First, you need to log onto your OpenSoundS account. Only logged on users can post on OpenSoundS (see above: How do I log onto OpenSoundS?)
  • Under the Collaborate section of the left-hand side menu, select Create Idea
  • The Create Idea page appears, where you can give your idea a title and
  • Provide a summary (see above: what are OpenSoundS ideas)
  • Describe the level of musical expertise that you expect from the project team, by choosing the drop-down list (basic, intermediate, advanced). If your particular idea is open for musicians and collaborators with various expertise, please choose the 'Not specified' option.
  • Describe the level of software expertise that you expect from the project team by choosing the drop-down list (basic, intermediate, advanced). If your particular idea is open for musicians and collaborators with various software/technology expertise, please choose the 'Not specified' option.
  • Describe the various software and/or technologies that you envisage using once your idea leads to a project. Try to be as specific as possible as this will help other people around the world to understand your needs and assess whether they could become part of the team.
  • Select the type of Creative Commons License that the resulting work will become available under. This is a very important part of the idea (and the project that the idea will lead to). Understanding copyright and intellectual property is a key objective within the OpenSoundS collaborative system. You can find a very helpful tutorial about Creative Commons right onto the OpenSoundS portal. Please feel free to read it.
  • Finally, you can upload any supporting material that you wish onto the platform, so that other people can form a better understanding about your idea, and asses how they could become part of your team. This could be anything that is related to you idea, like lyrics, chords, recordings, scribbles, diagrams, etc.
  • Once you finished providing the above information, simply click on Save
  • That's it! Your idea is now live and visible to your future team members!

How can I access Ideas on OpenSoundS?

Simply click on List of New Ideas under the Collaborate sub-menu on the left-hand side. There you will see all ideas that have been posted onto the OpenSoundS system, appearing in chronological order. Remember, you need to be logged onto OpenSoundS in order to post a response!

I am ready to create my own project. What should I do?

  • First, you need to log onto your OpenSoundS account. Only logged on users can post on OpenSoundS (see above: How do I log onto OpenSoundS?)
  • Upon successful login, click on the Create Project link, under the Collaborate sub-menu on the left-hand side
  • the Create Project page appears
  • first, give your project a title. This should be representative of your whole project (e.g. think of the title of a music album)
  • second, add an mp3 file as you main media file. This has to be an mp3 file so that everybody can play it on whatever technology or system they are using (computer, telephone, tablet device, etc)
  • third, select you team members! this is why it is always better to start with an idea (see above)! Here is where you invite other members of OpenSoundS to be part of your project!
  • fourth, add a description of your project: this is a very important part of your project. Explain what your ideas are about, what your aspirations are, what your needs are, what tools you have or planning to use, as well as any other information that will help the OpenSoundS community understand more about your project. The more information you provide, the greater the chances that people will want to collaborate with you!!!
  • fifth, if you have any additional composition elements that you want to post (e.g. individual tracks, sounds, effects, samples, loops, patches) you can post them into the composition elements section. Or, if you are using other people's work that is available in OpenSoundS, you can select them from the OpenSoundS file library. OpenSoundS supports a wide variety of file formats like wav, mp3, aif, aiff, ogg, wma, aac, flac, m4a, ape and others.
  • sixth, upload any other files that are not main composition elements. These can be instrument patches, notes, schemas, scores, or any other file that will help the team make music and/or create new composition elements and tracks.
  • seventh, provide keywords for your project and separate them with a comma (e.g. classical, violin, romantic). This is a very important part of your project. OpenSoundS hosts hundreds of projects and one of the easiest ways to navigate through those is to use appropriate keywords.
  • eighth, select the licence under creative commons that you want to release your project (see more information below). Attribution: acknowledge the author; non-commercial: cannot be used for commercial purposes; share-alike: apply the same license to derived works.
  • last, if your project has a constant beat, provide the Beats per Minute value (BPM). Classical tempi can be specified as TAGS eg. andante, presto, moderato, etc. Do not try to add these in the BPM box.
  • All done... click on Save and your project is now ready and online!

What are OpenSoundS tags?

OpenSoundS tags are meaningful keywords/labels that describe what the different projects are all about! This is an integral part of Web 2.0 and the semantic presentation of information. Tags help you
  • search for related work
  • make others understand what your work and ideas are about
  • identify projects that you might want to be involved with
  • locate samples and files that you could use in your own project
  • find people in the OpenSoundS community that you might want to collaborate with in the future
  • help other users find your project quickly using the OpenSoundS dynamic search engine

How can I browse the OpenSoundS projects' tags?

  • click on the Browse Tags link under the Collaborate sub-menu on the left-hand side
  • the Browse Tags page appears
  • all available tags appear in a cloud-view (also known as tag cloud, word cloud, or weighted list)
  • this means that the bigger and bolder a tag, the more popular it is
  • the list of tags is 'clever', you can click on any tag and you will automatically be shown all relevant projects on OpenSoundS

Can I find all of my projects and posts in one place?

Yes you can! First, simply log onto your OpenSoundS account (see above: How do I log onto OpenSoundS?). Upon successful login, go to My Page under the Collaborate sub-menu on the left-hand side.

How can I update my profile information?

  • First, simply log onto your OpenSoundS account (see above: How do I log onto OpenSoundS?).
  • Upon successful login, go to the top-right of the screen (where your username appears) and click on your username
  • a drop-down list appears
  • select the first option which is My account
  • press the Edit button at the top right of your profile page
  • update your information
  • click on Save at the bottom of the page
  • your new details are now online...

How do I post a comment?


  • First, you need to log onto your OpenSoundS account. Only logged on users can post on OpenSoundS (see above: How do I log onto OpenSoundS?)
  • Go to the project that you want to post a comment about (as mentioned above, there are numerous ways of doing that, either by using the search tool, or by browsing all projects, or by using the project tags, or the list of all projects... to name a few!)
  • Once you are inside the project page, navigate to the bottom of the page
  • Click on the Add new comment link
  • simply type your comment in the available box (you can also add a title if you want to - but this is not compulsory)
  • click on Save
  • All done, your comment has been posted online!
  • Remember: the OpenSoundS comments system is clever... it allows you to add media comments as well (for example, you can post a comment that includes a sound file -- like in YouTube where you can post a Video Response)

How do I share information about a project with other social media (e.g. Twitter or Facebook)?

  • simply go to the project that you are interested in using any of the above presented ways (browsing, search, recent projects, tags, project owners)
  • inside the project page and under the attributions information on the right you will see a share toolbar
  • if you hover your mouse pointer over the share toolbar, you will see a list appearing, with a large number of available social media (over 300, if you click on more!!!)
  • let say that we want to post the project information on Twitter
  • click on More... at the bottom-left of the sharing pop-up window
  • find Twitter (all social media appear in alphabetical order)
  • the tweet posting window appears, the message containing information about the project has been added automatically for you
  • simply use your login information (username/email and password)
  • click on the sign in and tweet button
  • all done!


Tuesday, October 9, 2012

VACANCY - RESEARCH OFFICER

INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION

University of London


Research Officer
MODE (Multimodal methodologies for Digital Environments) Research
Project: Methods and challenges for digital technologies and
embodiment

Department of Culture, Communication and Media
Faculty of Children and Learning

The starting salary will be in the range of £30,124 and £35,940 plus
£2,323 London Allowance per annum. The appointment will be at 1.0 FTE
and available from 07January 2013 for 16 months.


You will be required to participate in and contribute to all elements
of the project, collaborating closely with the project directors and
also liaise and communicate effectively with the Node team to ensure
the findings of the research project contribute to the development of
the Node themes and inform the training and capacity building
activities.

You will need a higher degree, preferably a doctorate, or comparable
research experience in cognitive science, education, sociology,
psychology, anthropology, or another relevant social science field and
significant experience of undertaking research within the field of
emergent technologies, such as tangible, mobile, ubiquitous
technologies and education. You will have experience of conducting
sustained qualitative fieldwork, notably the use of video as a
research tool and observation of technology-mediated interactions, and
computer generated/logged data.


In view of the nature of the work involved, any offer of appointment
will be conditional on a satisfactory Criminal Records Bureau Enhanced
Disclosure.

Reference: 7AC-CLCCM-5080-A

Closing date: 09 November 2012

To apply online please visit
http://jobs.ioe.ac.uk<http://jobs.ioe.ac.uk/> or tel 020 7612 6159

We positively encourage applicants from all sections of
under-represented communities

Monday, October 8, 2012

Call For Papers - Conference on Mechanical Musical Instruments in Historical Performance

Papers are invited for a 2-day conference to be held on Sunday 7th and
Monday 8th July 2013 at
the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, London. The event is a
collaboration between the
Guildhall School and the National Early Music Association (NEMA) and
will focus on all
aspects of how mechanical musical instruments might serve as sources
both for historical
repertoire and performance practice.

From water organs to player pianos. the production and reproduction of
music by mechanical
means has been a source fascination to many cultures. But what impact
can the study of these
machines have on live musicians studying the music, and the particular
ways of performing
music from past eras? What are the advantages, issues and problems
connected with this type of
research?

The conference will feature papers, a keynote address, a performance
by GSMD students on the
Historical Performance programme and also a visit (tbc) to the Colt
Clavier Collection – home
of the Barrel Organ featured on ERATO s recording of two Handel Organ
Concertos (among
other pieces) in the 1980s.

Abstracts of no more than 250 words for papers of 20mins or lecture
recitals of 30mins duration
should be submitted to and should include the following information:

-- Background
-- Research questions
-- Aims
-- Summary of content
-- Significance

Papers will be followed by a 5 -10 minute period for questions

Emily.Baines@stu.gsmd.ac.uk

to be received no later than Friday 1st February 2013

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Dr. Susan Knight Named Chancellor of Memorial University

On behalf of the Board of Directors of Shallaway - Newfoundland and
Labrador Youth in Chorus, I am delighted to share with you news that
Dr. Susan Knight – Founder and Artistic Director Emeritus, Shallaway
Newfoundland and Labrador Youth in Chorus - has been appointed the new
Chancellor of Memorial University.

Susan's appointment was announced on September 26th by Kathy
Dunderdale, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador. As the Premier
noted, Susan's appointment represents the first time in the history of
Memorial University that a woman has held this position!

We are truly thrilled and offer our sincerest congratulations to Susan!

http://today.mun.ca/news.php?news_id=7650



Karen Skinner

Chair

Board of Directors

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

AQL 2013 First Call for Papers, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, June 3-4, 2013

 

 

AQL 2013

10th International Conference on

Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech Research

June 3rd & 4th, 2013

&

Student Workshops

June 2nd & 5th, 2013

 

Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

 

Attached please find the official First Call for Papers document. The Final Call for Papers, providing further details is scheduled for broadcast via email around November 15, 2012. The online abstract submission will become active by October 1, 2012 at: www.aql2013.com/AbstractSubmission.html. The deadline for abstract submission is January 10, 2013. For up-to-date information on AQL 2013, please bookmark our official website at:

 

www.AQL2013.com

 

 

Additional questions can be addressed to Mrs. Ann Hurley at support@aql2013.com.

 

 

Welcome to Cincinnati!

 

Since its inception in 1996, the International Conference on Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech Research (AQL) has become one of the most valuable scientific meetings in the field of voice research. AQL is an advanced-level mid-size scientific conference specialized in quantitative methods for measurement and modeling of voice and speech, with an emphasis on translational research and clinical voice assessment.

 

The 10th AQL International Conference will be the first AQL conference that will take place in the United States. The 2-day core AQL conference will be hosted in the conference facilities of the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC), on June 3rd and 4th, 2013. In addition, six student workshops will be hosted in conference facilities and laboratories at CCHMC and the University of Cincinnati (UC), on June 2nd and June 5th, 2013. The student workshops will be presented by internationally known scientists with active scholarship in the Cincinnati area.

 

In AQL 2013, we especially encourage translational research studies in Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech. We invited keynote speakers who combine substantial track record in clinical laryngology and voice research. The keynote speakers, Drs. Gerald Berke (University of California Los Angeles), Robin Cotton (Cincinnati Children's Hospital and University of Cincinnati), Marshall Smith (University of Utah), and Mark Courey (University of California San Francisco); are amongst the most prominent otolaryngology experts. They will address the AQL Conference on the clinical needs for and the challenges to Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech Research in the areas of adult and pediatric voice. Discussion panels will follow each keynote lecture, which will add a very necessary supplemental translational value to the meeting. The goal is not only to report what we achieved in quantitative laryngology and voice research, but also to address the most immediate research needs of clinical laryngology and voice. It will help the scientists explore new translational research questions and will challenge the students to select new long-term paths for their scholarly development.

 

The 10th AQL will produce 2-page summary proceedings, which will be made available in print and online at the time of the conference. In addition, selected AQL 2013 papers will be published after peer review in a special supplement issue of the Journal of Voice.

 

We are looking forward to seeing you next year in the beautiful city of Cincinnati!

 

Dimitar Deliyski, PhD

Sid Khosla, MD

Alessandro de Alarcon, MD

Chairs of AQL 2013

 

Monday, September 17, 2012

Voting opens

Spread the word and vote for Something Special!
They are lovely.

Evangelos

Saturday, August 25, 2012

The 8th Art of Record Production Conference, July 12th – 14th 2013, Université Laval, Québec


Call for Papers

The 8th Art of Record Production Conference
July 12th – 14th 2013
Université Laval, Québec


Rewriting The Rules Of Production

The conference panel invites proposals for papers on the following themes:

Creative Practice In The Recording Studio

This stream is concerned with all aspects of creative practice in the studio: performance (e.g. the differences between the concert hall and the studio, new forms of performance activity), engineering and production (e.g. the creative abuse of technology, editing as creative practice), composing (e.g. issues of multiple authorship, the studio as a composing tool), improvising (e.g. the constraints and opportunities associated with improvisation in a controlled environment, improvising and overdubbing),  and also more hybrid forms of creative practice such as what we might call comprovisation, the way that improvisation becomes part of the compositional practice.

The Development of Recording Technology

How much have the 'rules' of production in the recording studio been written by the product manufacturers and software developers? The classic model of technological 'progress' as a logical and chronological progression has been enhanced with more nuanced discourses (such as Paul Théberge's Any Sound You can Imagine) in the past twenty years, but do recent changes require further revisions to be made? How has the notion of audio quality, both in the manufacturing sector and with the broader listening publics, changed over the years? And what of the ways that terms such as 'vintage', 'analogue' and the 'future of audio' have become embedded in the language of technology? With the waters of supply and demand models muddied by issues of gatekeeping, experts and rookies, the role of education and power of large suppliers to distort the economic system, this stream welcomes contributions that help us to navigate these complicated waterways.

Alternative Cultures of Production

The mainstream of the academic narratives of study in our field focus on the United States and the United Kingdom in the late twentieth century and the activities of a predominantly white, male, rock music community working in large scale recording studios for the larger record companies. This stream seeks to highlight academic work that focuses on the 'other' in its many and varied forms. These alternatives may be based on geography, nationality, chronology, race, gender, sexuality, musical style, production techniques, economic model or some other basis. They may be the mainstream itself in circles outside this anglo-centric narrative or they may be based on smaller niche communities. The aim of the stream is to incorporate and integrate the widest possible range of approaches and subject matter to create a more richly varied and nuanced academic field of study that doesn't fall into the mono-culture traps of traditional musicology.

* * * * *

The conference panel would like to invite delegates to submit ideas for presentations exploring aspects of music production, performances and practical demonstrations on any topic relating to the Art of Record Production.

We welcome work from any relevant academic perspective, including but not limited to popular music studies, ethnomusicology, the study of performance practice, communication and media studies, cultural studies, historical musicology, the history of technology, ergonomics, acoustics and psychoacoustics, music theory, music cognition, music and music technology education, and the philosophies of music, mediation and technology. Please include a note on methodology where appropriate, and an indication of the theme your work is intending to address.

Papers or demonstrations that require recording / studio / 5.1 playback facilities are also encouraged but selection will be subject to a feasibility study by the conference panel at Université Laval, Québec.

Proposals for individual papers and poster presentations should not exceed 500 words and should be in Word Document, Rich Text File or Text file formats (doc, docx, rtf or txt files).

Submissions by email to kji@artofrecordproduction.com

The deadline for proposals is September 24th 2012

Katia Isakoff
Director of the Art of Record Production Conference

Gérald Côté
Host of the 8th Art of Record Production Conference

Serge Lacasse
Host of the 8th Art of Record Production Conference

Sophie Stévance
Host of the 8th Art of Record Production Conference

Simon Zagorski-Thomas
Director of the Art of Record Production Conference

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Job Vacancy: Professor & Associate Dean (Research) at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Australia

 Dear all,

 

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music at the University of Sydney is currently seeking to appoint a Professor & Associate Dean (Research).  Please see below for details.  For further information and to apply, visit sydney.edu.au/positions and search by the reference number 865/0512.

 

PROFESSOR AND ASSOCIATE DEAN (RESEARCH)

The University of Sydney is Australia's first university and has an outstanding global reputation for academic and research excellence. It employs over 7500 permanent staff supporting over 49,000 students.

 

As the first conservatorium in Australia, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music has strong research activity in the fields of creative performance work, education, composition, musicology and sound. It seeks to appoint a distinguished academic as Associate Dean (Research) to build on its established strengths.

 

Under the broad direction of the Dean, Professor Karl Kramer, you will have responsibility for the overall academic leadership of the conservatorium in respect of all aspects of research and performance. With vision and enthusiasm you will foster activities designed to promote the conservatorium's research achievements within the scholarly and musical communities, both nationally and internationally.

 

A scholar of international distinction, you will provide leadership in fostering excellence in scholarship and in policy development. You will have oversight of the Research Higher Degree programs and will place particular emphasis on strategic planning and policy formulation with the aim of building the faculty's research capacity and performance.

 

While the focus of the position is academic management it is expected that you will continue to contribute to research and scholarship in your area of expertise. You will also chair meetings of the conservatorium's research committees, and liaise with other disciplines in relation to the management of policy and resources available for research initiatives.

 

To succeed, you will have proven academic management and leadership capabilities with experience in the maintenance of academic standards.  Additionally, you will have a record of original and innovative contributions to research, learning and teaching.

 

Term

The appointment to the position of Associate Dean will be for a period of 4 to 5 years (negotiable, and with the possibility of renewal), following which the successful candidate will revert to a continuing role at professor level.

 

Remuneration

The successful candidate will be offered an attractive remuneration package commensurate with the responsibilities of the position and the candidate's relevant experience and qualifications.

 

CLOSING DATE: 12 September 2012 

 

The University is an Equal Opportunity employer committed to equity, diversity and social inclusion.  Applications from equity target groups and women are encouraged. The University reserves the right to appoint by invitation and not to proceed with any appointment for financial or other reasons.


Tuesday, August 7, 2012

ISPS 2013 | Vienna | 28-31 August 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS
_________________________

ISPS 2013
Performing Together

28 | 31 August 2013
Vienna | Austria

www.performancescience.org
_________________________


The next International Symposium on Performance Science will be hosted
by the University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna (MDW), on 28-31
August 2013.

The ISPS 2013 theme, Performing Together, is intended to encourage
discussion and debate on collaborative performing activities of all
types and between various constituents. Specific research topics,
fields of study, and methodological approaches have been left open
intentionally to encourage interdisciplinary exchange.

Submissions detailing original research are invited from across the
performing arts and other performance disciplines, as well as the
natural, social, and applied sciences.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Tecumseh Fitch
University of Vienna (Austria)

Peter Keller
University of Western Sydney (Australia)

Emma Redding
Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance (UK)

Alan Wing
University of Birmingham (UK)

IMPORTANT DATES

30 November 2012: Paper/poster abstract submission deadline
15 January 2013: Registration for ISPS 2013 opens
1 February 2013: Notification of submission decision
1 March 2013: End of early registration
15 April 2013: Deadline for papers for the ISPS proceedings
28 August 2013: Start of ISPS 2013

SUBMISSIONS

Submissions are invited for

- Spoken papers
- Poster presentations
- Symposia and workshops

Detailed instructions for submissions are available via the conference
website: www.performancescience.org. Submissions should be made
electronically to cps@rcm.ac.uk by 30 November 2012.

GRADUATE AWARD

The Scientific Committee is keen to encourage the attendance of
students, as well as established researchers and practitioners.
Therefore, the ISPS 2013 Graduate Award will be offered to one
graduate student to present a keynote paper at the conference.

REVIEW PROCESS

Each submission will be reviewed anonymously by the Scientific
Committee according to its originality, importance, clarity, and
interdisciplinarity. Corresponding authors will be notified by email
of the Committee's decision by 1 February 2013.

CONFERENCE PUBLICATION

Accepted paper, poster, and symposium/workshop submissions will be
published as 6-page papers in the Proceedings of ISPS 2013 (complete
with ISBN), available in hardcopy at the conference and subsequently
downloadable via the conference website. Details of the procedure and
format for submitting published papers will be provided when authors
receive notification of acceptance. Final papers for publication will
be due on 15 April 2013.

REGISTRATION

Full and one-day registration options are available. Online
registration will open on 15 January 2013.

For further information about the venue, submissions, graduate award,
and registration, visit the conference website:
www.performancescience.org.

The official language of the conference is English.

__________________________________________

Aaron Williamon
Royal College of Music, London

Werner Goebl
University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna