Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Fwd: CSMC 2017 - Call for Panel Session Participation

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

Panel session - Domain-Specific Generative Music: Music in Computer Games at CSMC2017

https://csmc2017.wordpress.com/

=================================

Participants sought for a panel session entitled "Domain-Specific Generative Music: Music in Computer Games" being held at the 2nd Conference on Computer Simulation of Musical Creativity at The Open University in Milton Keynes, United Kingdom between the 11th and 13th of September 2017.

Participant should submit a brief description of the participant's perspective on the topic (100 words max) to simon.cutajar@open.ac.uk by Thurs Aug 10th.

 

Many thanks,

 

Simon Cutajar

----------------------------------

PhD Student

STEM

The Open University

Milton Keynes, United Kingdom

Email: simon.cutajar@open.ac.uk

Website: http://www.open.ac.uk/people/sc32924

-- The Open University is incorporated by Royal Charter (RC 000391), an exempt charity in England & Wales and a charity registered in Scotland (SC 038302). The Open University is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Vacancy: RSME Editor and Editorial Assistant

Vacancy: RSME Editor and Editorial Assistant

Research Studies in Music Education Journal

Editor position

Applications are invited for the Editor of the SEMPRE journal Research Studies in Music Education, 2017-2022, published by SAGE.

Research Studies in Music Education is a peer-reviewed journal, currently published in print twice a year, and moving to three times a year in 2019. The journal receives a large number of submissions across a wide range of disciplines related to the broadly conceived understanding of research in music education.

The primary role of Editor is to decide, with the support of anonymous peer review, which submissions merit publication in the Journal. The Editor should be an excellent and diplomatic communicator, self- motivated and highly organised, and with exceptional attention to detail. An excellent command of written and spoken English is essential. It is expected that the Editor should have expertise across a broad range of appropriate disciplines associated with music education research, as well as some experience of academic publishing. The Editor is supported by an editorial team, including a paid editorial assistant and an international Editorial Board, by SEMPRE, and by SAGE, the commercial academic publishers of the Journal. We welcome applications from individuals or dual/shared applications.

Interested applicants should send a full CV, list of two academic or other relevant referees and a 500 word statement of their vision for the future development of the Journal to Professor Graham Welch, Chair of SEMPRE ( graham.welch@ucl.ac.uk), by 31st August 2017. Enquiries are welcome to the current Editor, Professor Kathy Marsh ( kathryn.marsh@sydney.edu.au).

Editorial Assistant

The position of RSME Editorial Assistant currently carries an annual honorarium of £1,900 from appointment in 2017 (subject to tax, if applicable) and is an important role in supporting the Editor and Editorial Board of the Research Studies in Music Education Journal. It requires someone with exceptional attention to detail, good time management skills, an ability to manage a complex online system, and high levels of discretion, as well as knowledge of the academic subject matter covered by the journal. The approximate time involved is around 5-8 hours per week, depending on the flow of activity. The role includes dealing with author enquiries, checking manuscripts on submission and resubmission, proof reading of accepted manuscripts before they are passed to the publisher (e.g., checking style, English, academic conventions), and processing manuscripts through the SAGE online system in a timely fashion. The role also involves monitoring manuscript progress through the online system and ensuring the editorial team are kept informed of tasks in hand. In addition, the Editorial Assistant will support the editor with social media and digital initiatives, including posting on the RSME twitter account and, for example, curating thematic material from previously published topical RSME articles for online dissemination and discussion.

The post would suit a doctoral/post-doctoral student, or recent graduate in music education/psychology of music, or a closely related area, and it is intended that this appointment will provide at least some overlap between the current and new Editors (a new Editor will be appointed in 2017). Interested applicants should send a full CV and names of two referees (at least one of whom is academic) who can comment on their ability and motivation to undertake this work to Professor Graham Welch, Chair of SEMPRE ( graham.welch@ucl.ac.uk) by 30 September 2017. It is hoped that an appointment will be made by the end of October 2017 or soon after. Any informal enquiries about this role can be directed to the current Editorial Assistant, Samantha Dieckmann ( samantha.dieckmann@sydney.edu.au), or the current Research Studies in Music Education Editor, Professor Kathy Marsh ( kathryn.marsh@sydney.edu.au).

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Fwd: Early Reg CSMC 2017

Dear all,

Early registration for the second Conference on Computer Simulation
of Musical Creativity to be held at the Open University in Milton
Keynes (UK) from 11 to 13 Sept 2017 has opened until Aug 10th.

See: https://mcs-notes2.open.ac.uk/quickpay.nsf/Payment.xsp?ID=CSMC2017


The following calls have been extended until Aug 8th.

Panel Sessions: Please submit title and short description (max 200 words).

Short Talks: Please submit abstract (max 300 words).

Workshops/Tutorials: Please submit short description (max 300 words).

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Elaine Chew, Queen Mary, University of London

Dr. Anna Jordanous, University of Kent

Further details, including submission instructions at:
https://csmc2017.wordpress.com/

Best Wishes,
Robin Laney

The Open University is incorporated by Royal Charter (RC 000391), an
exempt charity in England & Wales and a charity registered in Scotland
(SC 038302).

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Fwd: [ISMIR-Community] Web Audio Conference 2017: Call for Participation

Dear all,

we are happy to announce that the programme for this year's Web Audio Conference (WAC) is now available on our website: http://wac.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/programme/

This will be the third installment of the conference (after IRCAM/Mozilla in Paris and GeorgiaTech in Atlanta) and will be held at the Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London from August 21-23, 2017.

The final programme features a wide range of oral paper presentations and talks, poster presentations, interactive demos, web-based artworks and installations, as well as two nights with performances and concerts. We are looking forward to fantastic keynotes given by Chris Chafe (CCRMA / Stanford University) and Franziska Schroeder (SARC / Queen's University Belfast). Additionally, there will be joint activities with the co-located Audio Mostly conference on Wednesday.

Further, there will be a wide variety of tutorials, given by Paul Adenot (Mozilla), Felicia Lim / Jamieson Brettle (Google), Nicholas Jillings / Ryan Stables (BCU), Christoph Guttandin (Media Codings) and Iwan Dewi Lavanant (...Loops). That means we will learn about the latest developments and additions to the web audio api right from Mozilla, Google's work on open standards for producing spatial audio in the browser, how to build audio effects on the web, how to effectively test web audio code and how to collaboratively improvise music in the browser.

So if you think that Web Audio is or will be relevant, please register today (early bird registration ends on 31 July).

We are looking forward to welcoming you to London!

Best wishes,
the WAC organizing committee

--
Dr Sebastian Ewert
Lecturer in Signal Processing
Centre for Digital Music (C4DM) and Machine Listening Lab (MLLAB)
School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science
Queen Mary University of London
+44 20 7882 8287

--
New open-access journal Transactions of ISMIR, open for submissions (tismir.ismir.net).
--
ISMIR 2017 will take place in Suzhou, China, October 23-28, 2017. Website: https://ismir2017.smcnus.org/
--
ISMIR 2018 will take place in Paris, France.
ISMIR 2019 will take place in Delft, The Netherlands.
ISMIR Home -- http://www.ismir.net/
--- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Community Announcements" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to community+unsubscribe@ismir.net.
To post to this group, send email to community@ismir.net.
Visit this group at https://groups.google.com/a/ismir.net/group/community/.
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/ismir.net/d/msgid/community/1763ec06-b888-0f4f-0008-846c81389fee%40qmul.ac.uk.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/a/ismir.net/d/optout.


*********
professor mark sandler, FREng
FIEEE, FAES, FIET
royal society wolfson research merit award holder

director of the centre for digital music (c4dm)

school of electronic engineering and computer science
queen mary university of london

mark.sandler@qmul.ac.uk
+44 (0)20 7882 7680+44 (0)7775 016715

@markbsandler, 
@semanticaudio to follow the FAST-IMPACt Programme Grant 



Monday, July 10, 2017

BEATBOXING without a Voicebox


Featuring Marv Radio (3-fold UK Beatbox Champion), La Verne Williams (Soprano), CTS male voice ensemble (lead Owen Stark), Marc Masson (piano) and our laryngectomy choir. 

Event date: Sunday 23rd July 

Time: 16:00-17:00

Location: Emmanuel Church, Lyncroft gardens, West Hampstead

Tickets details: http://www.shoutatcancer.org/tickets

Free Entry for Laryngectomees and Partner (do register!)

Link documentary on BBC II!

Link Facebook: 

Link youtube

Friday, July 7, 2017

Fwd: Study Day on Music and Space


Dear colleagues,

might be of interest to you or your students. Feel free to share widely.

Study Day on Space and Music - 28 October 2017 - University of Manchester
https://www.rma.ac.uk/news/2017-10-CFP-Music-and-Space.pdf

What do we mean when we talk about space in music? This study day aims to bring together composers, musicologists and practitioners from all areas of music to explore the concept of space in music. We encourage 20-minute presentations in any appropriate format such as papers, musical works, performances, etc. Participants can combine the study day with the MANTIS electroacoustic music festival in the evening of 28 October and 29 October.

Best regards,


-------------------------
N├║ria Bonet
PhD Candidate (Computer Music)
ICCMR, Plymouth University



This email and any files with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the recipient to whom it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient then copying, distribution or other use of the information contained is strictly prohibited and you should not rely on it. If you have received this email in error please let the sender know immediately and delete it from your system(s). Internet emails are not necessarily secure. While we take every care, Plymouth University accepts no responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan emails and their attachments. Plymouth University does not accept responsibility for any changes made after it was sent. Nothing in this email or its attachments constitutes an order for goods or services unless accompanied by an official order form.

[House of Lords Hansard] Education: English Baccalaureate

[copied from https://hansard.parliament.uk/lords/2017-07-03/debates/4AC97B74-6896-4BDA-908E-F0188DB1E757/EducationEnglishBaccalaureate]

Education: English Baccalaureate

Question

14:36:00

Asked by

The Earl of Clancarty
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will respond to the public consultation Implementing the English Baccalaureate which closed on 29 January 2016.

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Education (Lord Nash) (Con)
My Lords, the results of the consultation on implementing the English baccalaureate and the Government's response will be published in due course—I hope soon.

The Earl of Clancarty (CB)
My Lords, is this long delay because the overwhelming public response voices the concern that the EBacc excludes art and design subjects? I ask the Minister not to continue to justify the EBacc with the New Schools Network stats on the percentage of pupils taking one arts GCSE, which represented a shift away from other qualifications, but instead to look at the latest Ofqual figures revealing—two years in a row—a hugely alarming 8% decline in the take-up of arts GCSEs. The EBacc must be scrapped.

Lord Nash
I can tell the noble Earl that it is not a result of the points he has made. We have been considering carefully a great many responses, and there have been a few political issues in the meantime. I am certainly encouraged to see that we have been improving the quality of these subjects with help from the Royal Academy of Engineering and the James Dyson Foundation. The decline in the subjects to which the noble Earl refers has been more than made up for in the substantial increase in the number of pupils taking IT and the now almost 70,000 pupils taking computing.

Lord Baker of Dorking (Con)
My Lords, is the Minister aware that the GCSEs which are just now finishing this term have seen a drop in every technical subject and every creative and artistic subject? If this trend continues, there will be no technical education or creative education in schools for those aged under 16. This is a disgrace and really is unacceptable. Changes must be made to the EBacc, otherwise the Government will not meet their objective to improve technical education.

Lord Nash
I refer to my previous remarks about the take-up of computer science and the dramatic increase in the number of pupils taking IT. Of course, we must always remember the very low base that we had in 2010 when only one in five pupils was taking a core suite of academic subjects, which we know are so essential particularly for those from a disadvantaged background. I think that we should all be extremely pleased that we have actually doubled the percentage, which is rendering our education provision much more fit for pupils, particularly for pupils from a disadvantaged background.

Baroness McIntosh of Hudnall (Lab)
My Lords, can the Minister please explain the remarks he made in answer to the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty? I believe he said that the loss of entries into the creative subjects is more than made up for by an increased number of entries for IT and computer science. Can he explain in what way those things compensate for one another?

Lord Nash
Numerically. I think we all know that the quality of some of these subjects was not what it might be, and that quite a few people were taking some of them not because they suited them but because they were easier. Of course all schools teach many of these subjects, although it may not necessarily lead to exams, and of course all schools have to provide a broad and balanced curriculum—something which the new chief inspector seems to be particularly focused on, which I am very pleased to see.

Lord Addington (LD)
My Lords, does the Minister agree that a GCSE is a good basis for starting study? As there has been a drop of 50,000 in the number of those taking design and technology GCSE, how do we get a good basis for those going on to study creative and technical subjects if we cut a subject such as that?

Lord Nash
I agree that a GCSE is an extremely good basis. In fact, the drop in take-up of design and technology over the last six years has been less than the drop over the previous four years to 2010. We are keen to improve the quality of those subjects and to give our pupils a wider choice of subjects.

Lord Berkeley of Knighton (CB)
My Lords, given that the Government frequently salute the creative industries for what they bring into the Exchequer and the tourists they bring to this country, is the Minister not concerned about the next generation of creative artists, who are not getting the necessary inspiration they need while at school?

Lord Nash
Again, this assumes quite a lot. As I said, it is clear to us that a number of pupils taking these subjects in the past were not the next generation of creative artists; they were people that suited, for instance, the Labour Government's equivalence structure, whereby they were helping the statistics. Heads will respond only to the incentives set for them. We have set them an incentive to have many more pupils doing a core academic suite of subjects. That seems to be working and we should celebrate that. But we are investing considerably in the creative subjects, and we have a number of free schools and technical colleges focused specifically on that.

Lord Watson of Invergowrie (Lab)
I very much note the concerns expressed by noble Lords on the teaching of creative and technical subjects, but, perhaps offering the Minister some welcome respite, I will look at another aspect of this Question: the rather worrying trend developing in the Department for Education and its Ministers of the inordinate amount of time it takes them to respond to consultations. In January this year, I asked in a Written Question how many DfE consultations that had a closing date between January 2015 and September 2016 had still not been responded to, including the one in the Question asked by the noble Earl, Lord Clancarty. The Minister replied, saying that there were seven—one of which, incidentally, was the revision of fire safety for buildings in schools. That cavalier approach may have been something the Government felt they could get away with when they enjoyed a majority. Now that the Tories are merely the largest of the minority parties down the Corridor, will the Minister commit to noble Lords that he will ensure his department replies to consultations in a much timelier manner?

Lord Nash
I do not think that this slow pace of response is in and of itself necessarily cavalier, but I have said I very much hope that our response on EBacc will be available shortly, and I shall do all I can to try to make sure that we respond quickly in future.

Lord Cormack (Con)
My Lords, is my noble friend truly satisfied that we are exposing our young people to the beauties of art and music, and giving them a proper opportunity to participate, in what is becoming an increasingly depersonalised age where young people spend more time with their machines and hand-held devices than they do with their fellows?

Lord Nash
I certainly agree with my noble friend's comment about the amount of time our young people spend gazing at screens of one sort or another and the balance that subjects such as music, dance and drama can provide. Of course, all good schools do this, not necessarily aiming at exams—music and dance are compulsory in key stages 2 and 3, as is drama up to key stage 4. As I said, the chief inspector is very focused on this. I am sure that noble Lords will see the fruits of that work in due course.